Le sujet le plus tabou des affaires aujourd'hui: la rébellion

Le sujet le plus tabou des affaires aujourd'hui: la rébellion

januari 3, 2020 0 Door admin

Translating…


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69th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards - Show

Rebels who are anti-this or anti-that don’t get far, they used to say. It’s time to reclaim the word rebel. How’s this for a new definition? A rebel is someone who:

  • is willing to bring different people together.
  • will take the risk of collaborating across departments and industries that have never traditionally joined forces.
  • can commit to seeing talent and leadership in people who don’t think, act or experience life the way you do.

When all that talent and persistence comes together, there will be a tsunami of change in the workplace. But until then…it’s back to your regularly scheduled programming. Tune in as American workers, plagued by anxiety, stress and burnout (in large part because it is taboo to talk about these feelings openly) show up to work dissatisfied and unfulfilled. Despite such a tumultuous few years, breaking with tradition or corporate culture still feels like the biggest taboo in the workplace. And so they wait.

Feeling depressed yet? Please don’t. I promise there’s better news ahead. But, since problems usually get worse before they get better, I’ll hit you with a few more jarring statistics and so-called norms to end this year with—once and for all.

In 2020, this mental health rebel’s goal is to secure three basic necessities for more workers: trust, equanimity and connection to community.

1.   Trust

Ask yourself: Does anyone at work make you feel like you have a real relationship with them? Can you trust your peers? Do the leaders where you work even deserve your trust? If the answer is no, you’re probably pretty anxious and lonely. When only a few people have your back at work, it’s an emotional hazard. The best way to build trust with others is to start trusting yourself. For me, that required bringing my whole self to some very public work—anxiety, learning disability and all. I only wish I had rebelled against all of those people who told me to stay quiet about my ADHD and anxiety much sooner.

2.   Equanimity

 If an employee doesn’t feel valued or connected, things feel rocky or out of balance. That’s stressful, provokes anxiety and can cause burnout. How do you start the wheels of equanimity turning? In small chunks, the same way you might eat an elephant, as the saying goes. It requires patience. Start small. At the risk of sounding ridiculous, I suggest asking one question every day. How can I help?

I tried it. At first, people questioned my question, which was awkward. But ultimately, being helpful to others led to feeling respected—and that strengthened my voice. I connected with peers and vowed we would exit this rollercoaster of a year gracefully. As the new year approaches, I’m on solid ground. Sometimes trusting people who have once let you down is incredibly stressful. Don’t let it hold you back. You’ll lose out.

3.     Community and Positive Connection to Coworkers

On this one, I’ll be honest. You’re up against some serious obstacles. Recently, experts have said: 61% of bosses are bullies; 50% of millennials have left a job because of a toxic boss; 62% of missed workdays can be attributed to a mental health issue and 60% of people don’t have bosses who currently speak openly about mental health. 

Change does take time. For people with disabilities, waiting can be a bitter pill to swallow. This year is the 30thanniversary of the ADA. Three decades is too long to wait for businesses to follow the law. For neurodiverse people like me, who cheered when they read Harvey Blume brilliant words, “neurodiversity may be every bit as crucial for the human race as biodiversity is for life in general. Who can say what form of wiring will be best at any given moment?” it also feels like a long time to wait for a workplace where they can bring their whole self to work. Blume wrote the piece in the Atlantic in 1998. It’s been a journey. Here’s to seeing land soon.

“>

Despite the appeal of the original 9 to 5 trio, somebody probably told you it’s best not to be a rebel at work in real life—even if you are pretty darn talented.

69th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards - Show

LOS ANGELES, CA – SEPTEMBER 17: (L-R) Actors Lily Tomlin, Dolly Parton and Jane Fonda speak … [ ] onstage during the 69th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards at Microsoft Theater on September 17, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic)

FilmMagic

Rebels who are anti-this or anti-that don’t get far, they used to say. It’s time to reclaim the word rebel. How’s this for a new definition? A rebel is someone who:

  • is willing to bring different people together.
  • will take the risk of collaborating across departments and industries that have never traditionally joined forces.
  • can commit to seeing talent and leadership in people who don’t think, act or experience life the way you do.

When all that talent and persistence comes together, there will be a tsunami of change in the workplace. But until then…it’s back to your regularly scheduled programming. Tune in as American workers, plagued by anxiety, stress and burnout (in large part because it is taboo to talk about these feelings openly) show up to work dissatisfied and unfulfilled. Despite such a tumultuous few years, breaking with tradition or corporate culture still feels like the biggest taboo in the workplace. And so they wait.

Feeling depressed yet? Please don’t. I promise there’s better news ahead. But, since problems usually get worse before they get better, I’ll hit you with a few more jarring statistics and so-called norms to end this year with—once and for all.

In 2020, this mental health rebel’s goal is to secure three basic necessities for more workers: trust, equanimity and connection to community.

1.   Trust

Ask yourself: Does anyone at work make you feel like you have a real relationship with them? Can you trust your peers? Do the leaders where you work even deserve your trust? If the answer is no, you’re probably pretty anxious and lonely. When only a few people have your back at work, it’s an emotional hazard. The best way to build trust with others is to start trusting yourself. For me, that required bringing my whole self to some very public work—anxiety, learning disability and all. I only wish I had rebelled against all of those people who told me to stay quiet about my ADHD and anxiety much sooner.

2.   Equanimity

 If an employee doesn’t feel valued or connected, things feel rocky or out of balance. That’s stressful, provokes anxiety and can cause burnout. How do you start the wheels of equanimity turning? In small chunks, the same way you might eat an elephant, as the saying goes. It requires patience. Start small. At the risk of sounding ridiculous, I suggest asking one question every day. How can I help?

I tried it. At first, people questioned my question, which was awkward. But ultimately, being helpful to others led to feeling respected—and that strengthened my voice. I connected with peers and vowed we would exit this rollercoaster of a year gracefully. As the new year approaches, I’m on solid ground. Sometimes trusting people who have once let you down is incredibly stressful. Don’t let it hold you back. You’ll lose out.

3.     Community and Positive Connection to Coworkers

On this one, I’ll be honest. You’re up against some serious obstacles. Recently, experts have said: 61% of bosses are bullies; 50% of millennials have left a job because of a toxic boss; 62% of missed workdays can be attributed to a mental health issue and 60% of people don’t have bosses who currently speak openly about mental health. 

Change does take time. For people with disabilities, waiting can be a bitter pill to swallow. This year is the 30thanniversary of the ADA. Three decades is too long to wait for businesses to follow the law. For neurodiverse people like me, who cheered when they read Harvey Blume brilliant words, “neurodiversity may be every bit as crucial for the human race as biodiversity is for life in general. Who can say what form of wiring will be best at any given moment?” it also feels like a long time to wait for a workplace where they can bring their whole self to work. Blume wrote the piece in the Atlantic in 1998. It’s been a journey. Here’s to seeing land soon.


CBD Olie kan helpen bij ADHD. Lees hoe op MHBioShop.com


Huile de CBD peut aider avec TDAH. Visite HuileCBD.be


 
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